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by Sarah Palin on Friday, April 8, 2011 at 10:31am

Yesterday the House passed H.R. 1363, which funds our Department of Defense and our military for the rest of the year at their current levels. It allows for the continuation of current military operations, which is pretty important when you’re fighting three wars. It also funds the government for another week and cuts $12 billion in wasteful spending. So why would the Commander in Chief declare that he will veto this? Why would he play politics at the expense of our troops who are putting everything on the line to protect us? Memo to the President: I doubt the insurgents will stop and wait for a government shutdown to end before resuming actions. You need to fund our troops, sir.

Like me, you might be asking yourself: Why on earth would he threaten to veto funding for the troops? What is his game plan? Basically, he’ll veto military funding because he wants the rest of the government funded too. And by the rest of the government, he means things like Harry Reid’s “Cowboy Poetry.” Essentially, he’s holding military funding hostage to NPR funding. This is a perfect analogy for what is wrong with this entire budget showdown. Our federal government has strayed so far from what is constitutionally mandated that they are blind to the fact that NPR funding is not a constitutional duty. Funding our military at a time of war is!

The House GOP does not want a shut down. They just want legitimate cuts (and I would argue not even enough!). If we can’t agree to cut a billion here and a billion there, we’ll never close this $1.5 trillion deficit.

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Sarah Palin’s Facebook Page Remembering 9/11: 

We Are Americans It has been eight years since the United States suffered the worst attack on our soil since Pearl Harbor. As we look back, we should take stock of what has transpired since then. We have sent our nation’s soldiers into battlefields far from home to defend us. These brave men and women live in treacherous conditions, facing improvised roadside bombs, suicide bombers and other attacks. Yet they fight on in their mission to defend the United States and all of us without complaint. Our all-volunteer service is made up of Americans of all races, creeds, and economic backgrounds. These soldiers are on the front lines of this battle, and there are others in the fight as well. We must continue to give our utmost support to the United States military and those that support their efforts. In light of this, I have added my name to a letter sent to President Obama urging him to remain committed to prosecuting the War on Terror in Afghanistan. Never have so few defended the liberty of so many. We must continue to support their mission because they will continue to fight for us. President Reagan ended his first inaugural with this story: Under one such marker lies a young man-Martin Treptow-who left his job in a small town barber shop in 1917 to go to France with the famed Rainbow Division. There, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire. We are told that on his body was found a diary. On the flyleaf under the heading, “My Pledge,” he had written these words: “America must win this war. Therefore, I will work, I will save, I will sacrifice, I will endure, I will fight cheerfully and do my utmost, as if the issue of the whole struggle depended on me alone.” The crisis we are facing today does not require of us the kind of sacrifice that Martin Treptow and so many thousands of others were called upon to make. It does require, however, our best effort, and our willingness to believe in ourselves and to believe in our capacity to perform great deeds; to believe that together, with God’s help, we can and will resolve the problems which now confront us. And, after all, why shouldn’t we believe that? We are Americans. God bless you, and thank you. As we look back to that tragic day eight years ago we take pride in the fact that we came together as a nation in the days, months and years that followed. We rose to the challenge that fateful day and we still can. And why shouldn’t we believe that? We are Americans. I thank all our servicemen and women, in and out of uniform, for keeping us safe over the last eight years in the face of enormous odds. Please thank a veteran today. They certainly do not look for those thanks, but they have more than earned it. –

 Sarah Palin

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"Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell"? Don’t Change
By Floyd and Mary Beth Brown
As Barack Obama prepares to be sworn in as commander in chief on January 20, homosexual-rights activists are gleeful about changes he will bring to the armed services. Based on his campaign promises, Obama is expected to overturn the military’s policy regarding sexual conduct. Commonly referred to as “don’t ask, don’t tell” the military prohibits the service of openly practicing homosexuals. This policy was created early in the Clinton administration after a long and divisive fight and the hard-fought compromise has drawn the ire of liberals such as Obama ever since.
“It’s time to turn the page on the bitterness and bigotry that fill so much of today’s LGBT (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender) rights debate,” Obama said while campaigning. “The rights of all Americans should be protected — whether it’s at work or anyplace else. ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ needs to be repealed because patriotism and a sense of duty should be the key tests for military service, not sexual orientation."
Not reported in the media or discussed by advocates are the opinions of the men and women actually serving our country that would be affected by this change in policy. A poll of some 2,000 active duty military taken in December by the Military Times found that 58 percent opposed a policy change. Of those polled, 10 percent said they would not reenlist, and 14 percent reported they would consider not reenlisting if the policy is changed to please homosexual activists.
Essentially, the United States military, the greatest fighting force ever assembled, has had a policy in place against homosexual conduct since its formation. This policy annoys certain liberals who want to force their social agenda on the rest of the country and ignore those affected.
Bill Clinton tried in the 1990s to end the prohibition of homosexual activity in the armed forces, but his attempt to do so was heavily criticized by members of both parties. The opposition was led by Sam Nunn, a Democrat from Georgia. After much haranguing, a compromise was reached that stated “…the prohibition against homosexual conduct is a long-standing element of military law that continues to be necessary in the unique circumstances of military service.”
Barring a pre-enlistment question about homosexuality "was the only compromise Congress let Clinton get away with," says Elaine Donnelly, president of the non-profit Center for Military Readiness which supports continuing the ban. "The law respects the power of sexuality and the normal human desire for modesty in sexual matters." There have been on-and-off efforts to repeal this law over the last few years, but those are expected to intensify with Obama’s support.
While Obama is clearly in favor of repealing this law, the question becomes, when will he push for it? Some pundits believe that Obama will act quickly because he is eager to appease the gay leaders after he upset many homosexuals by selecting Rick Warren, a staunch supporter of traditional marriage, to give the invocation at his inauguration. Obama also appears to be tapping Bill White, a gay man, to be his Navy secretary, which will certainly bring the policy regarding sexual conduct to the forefront.
As Obama weighs his options, a reason for him to pause is a Wall Street Journal survey. It found that the top issue motivating people to vote Republican, which returned control of Congress to the GOP in 1994, was Clinton’s attempt to lift the military ban on homosexuality. There is certainly no public mandate for this social change.
If Barack Obama stays true to his campaign promises, the armed forces will likely lose hundreds of thousands of troops. When our troop numbers are already stretched thin, we don’t need radical policies driving away more. Nevertheless, Obama appears poised to stubbornly buck centuries of military tradition by going against the will of the American people, as well as those in the military who will be affected by this change.
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Floyd and Mary Beth Brown are bestselling authors and speakers. Mary Beth’s latest book is featured at www.condibook.com. Together they maintain a blog at www.2minuteview.com.

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I am speechless

God bless each one of them and God Bless America

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This came as a comment but I feel compelled to put this in the open so others might understand what  veterans, who sacrificed for this country go through. It is heartbreaking. Pass this along.

By Joshua C. Poulsen

On the 11th Day of the 11th month each year, Americans come together to honor those in uniform, the ones who sacrificed for our nation, on Veterans Day. As a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan, War on Terror, I urge everyone to take this day to not just thank a veteran, but to talk with veterans. Learn about how our experiences have shaped our lives and what issues we face as we make our transitions back to civilian life. I would like to explain my side of the story, my own experience.

 

When I joined the military I was a young, confused kid, who did not know much about life, due to being sheltered for most of my life by my over protective parents. I did not know much about the war, just that I was enraged at the hatred those terrorists had for all Americans and me.  I wanted to help my country, to protect it at all cost, even giving up my life to do so.  It may sound funny but when I initially tried to enlist in the military, I was to be a military post-man, but the job had already been taken.  Since I am color-blind, I wasn’t able to have a range of opportunities in the military.  My placement was therefore in Mortuary Affairs Specialist.  I felt that I grew up quicker in my years in service than most people do in their whole lifetime.

 

I was nineteen years old on February 8th, 2002. It was kind of cold for Phoenix as I reached the Airport headed to Fort Jackson, in South Carolina for basic training. Upon reaching Fort Jackson, referred by some in the service as relaxant Jackson, I found that the life I had chosen would not be as easy as I thought. Those first couple of days I got a haircut, issued uniforms, and learned the waiting line for training was long. During this time, since 9/11, there was a mass influx of new recruits; the Army had problems finding them units to train in. For me I was lucky kind of, since I had a school date that did not come around very often, they tried to offer me another job, but I turn them down, I was shipped from Fort Jackson, then to Fort Lenderwood Missionary. The Ozark Mountains are cold and during winter, it was unbearable.  It was an extreme change for me because I was mostly familiar with the hot weather in Phoenix, AZ.  Exercising and running in extreme weather with being out shape was horrible.  There was no special treatment for anyone but the drill sergeants made me work twice as hard.  The treatment I received was something similar to a movie, where the fat kid got picked on and abused, but it was something I needed in order to become who I need to be.  Despite this, I worked hard, did everything I was ordered to do, and eventually I graduated from boot camp with a new physique.  During graduation, my fellow recruits honored me with “The Most Changed Person” reward, the Order of the Dragoon.

 

I was off to my next challenge, training for my MOS. When I reached Fort Lee, Virginia, I missed my start date and had to wait for the next one.  This meant that I couldn’t get a pass to go anywhere; I had to just sit at the barracks, clean the floors, and do KP duty. After awhile this routine got incommodious. I was so happy on Memorial Day 2002, because the next day I was scheduled to start school. Then all of a sudden, I had horrible stomach pains, and could not figure what it was. So I was sent me off to the ER, the doctors initially diagnosed appendix problems.  The one-hour surgery was then scheduled immediately; however it took five hours to complete. Apparently, my appendix had been ruptured for over a month including basic training.  The surgeons said I am so lucky to be alive.  I got a month off to recover and relax. When I got back to Fort Lee, I had to wait another month for class, so eventually when I got to school; I did my best to learn about my job and almost graduated at the top of my class. The reason why I did not graduate at the top of my class was due to my stomach muscles not fully recovering, which made doing sit-ups very hard.   I did it because I wanted to join my unit at Fort Lee.

 

My feelings of excitement and wanting to serve were still intact even after months of prolong waiting and recovery.  In order to be all that I could be, to be the best, I exceed my own abilities by 120%. The mindset I had, came a long way (physically from Phoenix and mentally from the first story I heard about the terrorist attacks), I had really changed for the better. In the first year, I received my first (minor) medal, the Army Achievement Medal. With this acknowledgement from the Army, I wanted to speed up my deployment overseas to Afghanistan, but that wasn’t going to happen until March 18th 2003. According to orders, my team that I was assigned to from my unit wasn’t schedule to arrive in Iraq first. Instead, I worked in the Theater Mortuary Affairs Evacuation Point, a place that went nonstop for the first three months.

 

Sleep was limited to when I did not hear a helicopter, and when body’s slowed down coming in. In the states I had worked at the Richmond Morgue, but war was different. Instead of just seeing someone you did not know in the states, in Kuwait you learn to know everyone, due to them wearing the same uniform, and inventorying all their personal effects, you knew who they wear when they left. Not only was our job to process Americans, but we also helped process British, and any other Allies. During this time I saw the mistakes we made, such as shooting British helicopter down with Sam missiles, and killing Brazilin journalist when we hit the wrong building, during that time I saw the horrors that mankind was possible of. I start experiences, problems, and tried to seek medical help, but I was deferred and told I would be fine. My excitement had come to an end, and I start to get in trouble, pretty soon my 1st Sgt, thought that I was not experiencing enough of the war, so he sent me to the Iraq, Camp Alsad. In Camp Alsad, was slow, but became difficult. Some of the soldiers I ate with at the chow hall, and knew were head on a rest and relaxation mission, but instead of making it, their helicopter was shot down. My team had to go clean the site, recover the bodies, and inventory their belongings. Man life is tough, but even tougher if you know the people. There were two other tough missions. The first were, when three Special Forces soldiers had been killed, when they were given orders not to shoot into a crowd even if they were receiving fire, not only did we have to process their bodies, but we also had to process the bodies of the people who had killed them. We are mortuary affairs first, and as such we have a moral obligation not to look at uniform, or lack of one, but to look at the person and understand their journey had come to a end, and it was our job to treat them with respect because everyone has family and friends that care for them, it was not are job to judge right or wrong, which is very hard. The second tough mission was when we went with a convoy head to a site that they had reportedly killed Sadam Husain, but in fact the compound was filled with animals and women and children. I do not think the Air Force meant to kill them, they were trying to do their job in following cell phone singles, and when they split, they went after the most likely target. On this mission two things had happened. One back in Alsad I was having bad night terrors, but the person in charge of my team figured the answer was not sending me back, but instead was to put me on night duty, and to change the location I slept on, in the location I was, this almost spelled disaster for me and my friend, when I woke up and started to scream at the top of my lungs, the people sleeping around the truck react and were about to shoot in the back of the truck, when my Sgt yelled stop he is just dreaming, oh thank god. The second thing is as I stated before, we are trained to respect the dead, and their belongings.  This did not transfer to the people there, instead they were ordered to bury everything, destroy all evidence and move on. That pretty much covers Iraq.

 

When I got back to the states, I faced many hardships under the care of the Army.  I am like millions of other veterans dealing with mental and physical scars of war.  Most Americans will never know about these issues because it is not covered in the news or articles. The Army has become a two-sided issue for me; it was once a place where I wanted to succeed at being a great solider and fight for our rights and our country.  Now that I came home I am still fighting another battle, however, this fight, I fight alone.  I am trying to cope with sudden flashbacks, traumatizing combat events, hyper-vigilance to the recurrence of danger, feelings of numbness, low self-esteem, rage, and lapses in concentration.  All of these have caused me to descend in my quality of life.  I thought the Army and my unit would continue to care for me, treat me as a fellow soldier, and assist me with finding resources for coping and healing.  However, this was not the case; my unit classified me as a troublemaker, an unfit solider.  As a result, they discharged me out of the Army abruptly without taking responsibility for the causes of my PTSD illnesses.  Like other soldiers, I tried to reach out for help but once the system failed, I tried to commit suicide twice during my service.  Luckily, both times, one of my few friends stopped me.  This incident put me in a mental hospital involuntarily, where they doped me up on strong medicines, and no one cared to seek the reasons behind the action.  I wasn’t allowed to receive my care at the Army hospital, because if procedures were followed, there would have been a long investigation and no one wanted to take the time to take care of their wounded soldiers with PTSD.  Instead, I was discharged immediately with personality disorder.  This seems to be the common practice for the Army, not just in my case but also 20,000 other veterans.  At 5 P.M. September 16, 2004, my last official orders from the Army were, TO GET OUT!!  Heavily medicated, I received my car keys, and was told to drive over 5000 miles, all the way home to Phoenix, Arizona.  My feelings that proscribed afterwards are indescribable. 

 

Even though I am still in my own body, this whole experience has shaped my life.  Following my physical return home to Phoenix, AZ, I, however, didn’t return home with my state of mentality.  My homecoming wasn’t what I imagined, that is because it was based on TV and movies I’ve seen about returning soldiers as heroes.  I became hospitalized time and time again.

 

Doesn’t worry, my story gets better and does have a great beginning.  This new chapter in my life begins with the chance meeting the love of my life, my wife.  With her continued support, I am able to handle some things on my own.  A great support system, love, understanding, and patience, is what I think all soldiers should have and receive upon their return home.  After all, the important issue is that we are all humans!  With the good and the bad, we will always have our memories.

 

So on this Veterans Day and every day the best way to honor our veterans is to connect with them. So please remember and honor our fellow humans, our veterans. Without recognition from our family and friends, it doesn’t seem like all of our efforts make a difference.  Many of us new veterans are being left behind, we have honored you by defending your rights, and all we ask is to welcome us home.

 

Sincerely,

Joshua C. Poulsen

Iraq and Afghanistan Veteran

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To all veterans who have so gallantly fought for this Mighty County…..

We remember your sacrifices and thank you.

milita1

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  Turning BACK TIME – 1968
 
As we prepare to set our clocks back, we should ask ourselves if we’re also going to turn back the political clock to the failed policies of an earlier generation.  Using the Great Societyof the 1960s as its model, an Obama administration would attack the entire spectrum of real and imagined social ills with new or re-invigorated federal programs.  There will be costly special programs for every disgruntled interest group imaginable.  As in the 1960s, they would fund these programs by cutting back our military just as success is in sight, and by greatly increasing taxes on the most productive people here at home, those who create the jobs the rest of us depend on.
 
At great cost, the Great Society failed to alleviate poverty, improve public education or erase class distinctions.  Then as now, higher taxes resulted in higher prices, unemployment and erosion of investments.  The remedies of 1968 are no more relevant today than those of 1929 were in 1968.  Let’s not repeat the mistakes that led to the malaise and chronic economic stagflation of the 1970s.
 
Paul Viscovich, Weston, FLORIDA
 
It is heartening to note that not all Americans are willing to be led by Obama, the new Pied Piper, to hell.

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